Today we are listening to

Peter Björn and John

Peter Björn and John were formed in Stockholm, Sweden, in 1999. Made up of members Peter Morén on vocals, guitar, and harmonica; Björn Yttling on vocals, bass, vocals, and keyboards; and John Eriksson on drums, percussion, and vocals, the band is influenced by the sounds of classic '60s baroque pop, power pop, and new wave, but the guys aren't revivalists. Instead they created some of the most exciting and original indie rock of the mid-2000s. The band began playing gigs soon after forming and quickly began appearing on compilations alongside other artists. After releasing three singles, the band released its self-titled first album in 2002 on the tiny Beat That! label. After more shows and more singles and an EP, the group jumped to the Planekonomi label in 2004 and released the Beats, Traps and Backgrounds EP. It was soon followed by the wonderful 2004 full-length release Falling Out, which was picked up for American release by Hidden Adenda in late 2005. The record placed them, along with The Concretes, the Shout Out Louds and the The Legends, at the forefront of the sparkling wave of great pop bands coming from Sweden. Their third album, Writer's Block, followed a year later.
The third album deserves every bit of attention and hype it's received, from large media outlets right down to the lowliest blog. It's a major work of post-everything indie rock that has enough hooks, production genius, and emotional strength to make other rock acts (indie or otherwise) sound like they are just wasting everyone's time. The group's previous two albums were excellent power pop records with an excess of brains and style, whereas Writer's Block scales back the guitars in favor of subtler arrangements that deliver just as much power sonically and ups the stakes in every other way. Every song has that kind of stripped-down production style that brings the music fully to life. Check the steel drums on "Let's Call It Off," the shh-shh-shh percussion on "The Chills," or the majestic tubular bells of "Roll the Credits" for Spectorian shoegaze production magic. Or look at the infectious single "Young Folks" for the key to why the record sounds so right. [SOURCE ALL MUSIC]
OFFICIAL SITE
• CHECK THE VIDEO OF Young Folks ON YOUTUBE {courtesy of BLOOMTV}
• LOOK FOR THE ALBUM HERE
• AND THEN BUY IT AT ITUNES STORE

1 Comment:

  1. John the Pope said...
    If I told you things I did before
    Told you how I used to be
    Would you go along with someone like me?
    If you knew my story word for word
    Had all of my history
    Would you go along with someone like me?

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